Astronomer upptäcker nytt binärsystem av typen Be/X-ray

compact neutron star or a black hole. Based on the mass of the companion star, astronomers divide them into low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). Be/X-ray binaries (Be/XRBs) are the largest subgroup of HMXBs. These systems consist of Be stars and, usually, neutron stars, including pulsars. Observations have found that most of these systems showcase weak persistent X-ray emission that is interrupted by outbursts lasting several weeks. 4XMM J182531.5–144036 was initially detected as a hard X-ray source in April 2008 with ESA's XMM-Newton satellite. Given that its nature remains undisclosed, a team of astronomers led by Open University's Andrew Mason Jr. has analyzed the available data from XMM-Newton, NASA's Chadra spacecraft, Very Large Telescope (VLT) and UKIDSS (UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) Galactic Plane Survey, in order to investigate this source. The study found that the position of 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is coincident with an infrared object exhibiting a near-infrared excess when compared to the spectra of early B-type dwarf or giant stars. This object also displays a strong hydrogen emission line. The researchers noted that these properties are characteristic for Be stars. Furthermore, coherent X-ray pulsation of 4XMM J182531.5–144036 was detected, with a period of 781 seconds. The presence of such a pulsation is typical for BeXRB pulsars. The astronomers added that the X-ray pulse profile is asymmetric, which is seen in X-ray pulsars and it can provide information about the magnetic field structure of the neutron star. According to the paper, the X-ray pulsation is seen with the same profile in widely separated XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. This indicates that the X-ray emission is likely persistent. When it comes to the orbital period of 4XMM J182531.5–144036, the researchers calculate that it is within the range of 250–500 days. The orbit of the system was found to have a low eccentricity. "We therefore conclude that 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is a newly identified persistent, long period, Be/X-ray binary," the authors of the study wrote. The astronomers estimate that the distance to 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is between 3,300 and 23,00 light years. However, they noted that the system is too faint to be detected by ESA's Gaia satellite so no independent distance estimate is available. More information: A. B. Mason et al, 4XMM J182531.5–144036: A new persistent Be/X-ray binary found within the XMM-Newton serendipitous survey, arXiv (2024). DOI: 10.48550/arxiv.2401.02468 Journal information: arXiv © 2024 Science X Network Explore further XTE J1906+090 is a persistent low-luminosity Be X-ray binary, study suggests Facebook Twitter Email Feedback to editors Featured Last Comments Popular From disorder to design: Exploring electrical tuning of branched flow in liquid crystal films 45 minutes ago 0 Automated laboratory system uses robotic equipment directed by AI to reengineer enzymes 53 minutes ago 0 A new approach to realize highly efficient, high-dimensional quantum memories 1 hour ago 0 Astronomers discover new Be/X-ray binary system 1 hour ago 0 Saturday Citations: The Dark Energy Survey; the origins of colorblindness; the evolution of heads Jan 13, 2024 1 Unlocking the magnetic superpowers of topological magnons 6 minutes ago The power of pause: Controlled deposition for effective and long-lasting organic devices 18 minutes ago Study proposes new approach for monitoring genetic diversity in Europe to help species adapt to climate change 22 minutes ago German scientists develop new mutasynthesis approach for derivatization of antibiotics 27 minutes ago Feeding mode of ancient vertebrate tested for first time 35 minutes ago Tracking molecules at turbo speed 43 minutes ago From disorder to design: Exploring electrical tuning of branched flow in liquid crystal films 45 minutes ago Automated laboratory system uses robotic equipment directed by AI to reengineer enzymes 53 minutes ago Engineers uncover new mechanism for gene transfer 1 hour ago Armor for steel: New method could enable advances in energy, electronics and aerospace 1 hour ago Relevant PhysicsForums posts Faraday pulsation 1 hour ago Stellar evolution path and Regression line 9 hours ago Would discovery of a galaxy without dark matter disprove MOND? 15 hours ago Our Beautiful Universe - Photos and Videos Jan 12, 2024 Sample and Return of Asteroid Bennu - live on Oct 20, 2020 at 1720 GMT Jan 12, 2024 Where are the black holes? Jan 10, 2024 More from Astronomy and Astrophysics 1 2 Medical Xpress Medical research advances and health news Tech Xplore The latest engineering, electronics and technology advances Science X The most comprehensive sci-tech news coverage on the web Newsletters Science X Daily and the Weekly Email Newsletter are free features that allow you to receive your favorite sci-tech news updates in your email inbox Follow us Top Home Search Mobile version Help FAQ About Contact Science X Account Premium Account Archive News wire Android app iOS app RSS feeds Push notification © Phys.org 2003 - 2024 powered by Science X Network Privacy policy Terms of use Managed by Google. Complies with IAB TCF. CMP ID: 300 1 / 1 UKIDSS J-band finding chart for 4XMM J182531.5–144036. The red circle is centered on the XMM-Newton detected position, with a radius of 1′′ equal to the positional error. The white circle is centered on the Chandra detected position and has a radius of 0.6′′ equal to its positional error. Credit: arXiv (2024). DOI: 10.48550/arxiv.2401.02468
compact neutron star or a black hole. Based on the mass of the companion star, astronomers divide them into low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). Be/X-ray binaries (Be/XRBs) are the largest subgroup of HMXBs. These systems consist of Be stars and, usually, neutron stars, including pulsars. Observations have found that most of these systems showcase weak persistent X-ray emission that is interrupted by outbursts lasting several weeks. 4XMM J182531.5–144036 was initially detected as a hard X-ray source in April 2008 with ESA's XMM-Newton satellite. Given that its nature remains undisclosed, a team of astronomers led by Open University's Andrew Mason Jr. has analyzed the available data from XMM-Newton, NASA's Chadra spacecraft, Very Large Telescope (VLT) and UKIDSS (UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) Galactic Plane Survey, in order to investigate this source. The study found that the position of 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is coincident with an infrared object exhibiting a near-infrared excess when compared to the spectra of early B-type dwarf or giant stars. This object also displays a strong hydrogen emission line. The researchers noted that these properties are characteristic for Be stars. Furthermore, coherent X-ray pulsation of 4XMM J182531.5–144036 was detected, with a period of 781 seconds. The presence of such a pulsation is typical for BeXRB pulsars. The astronomers added that the X-ray pulse profile is asymmetric, which is seen in X-ray pulsars and it can provide information about the magnetic field structure of the neutron star. According to the paper, the X-ray pulsation is seen with the same profile in widely separated XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. This indicates that the X-ray emission is likely persistent. When it comes to the orbital period of 4XMM J182531.5–144036, the researchers calculate that it is within the range of 250–500 days. The orbit of the system was found to have a low eccentricity. "We therefore conclude that 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is a newly identified persistent, long period, Be/X-ray binary," the authors of the study wrote. The astronomers estimate that the distance to 4XMM J182531.5–144036 is between 3,300 and 23,00 light years. However, they noted that the system is too faint to be detected by ESA's Gaia satellite so no independent distance estimate is available. More information: A. B. Mason et al, 4XMM J182531.5–144036: A new persistent Be/X-ray binary found within the XMM-Newton serendipitous survey, arXiv (2024). DOI: 10.48550/arxiv.2401.02468 Journal information: arXiv © 2024 Science X Network Explore further XTE J1906+090 is a persistent low-luminosity Be X-ray binary, study suggests Facebook Twitter Email Feedback to editors Featured Last Comments Popular From disorder to design: Exploring electrical tuning of branched flow in liquid crystal films 45 minutes ago 0 Automated laboratory system uses robotic equipment directed by AI to reengineer enzymes 53 minutes ago 0 A new approach to realize highly efficient, high-dimensional quantum memories 1 hour ago 0 Astronomers discover new Be/X-ray binary system 1 hour ago 0 Saturday Citations: The Dark Energy Survey; the origins of colorblindness; the evolution of heads Jan 13, 2024 1 Unlocking the magnetic superpowers of topological magnons 6 minutes ago The power of pause: Controlled deposition for effective and long-lasting organic devices 18 minutes ago Study proposes new approach for monitoring genetic diversity in Europe to help species adapt to climate change 22 minutes ago German scientists develop new mutasynthesis approach for derivatization of antibiotics 27 minutes ago Feeding mode of ancient vertebrate tested for first time 35 minutes ago Tracking molecules at turbo speed 43 minutes ago From disorder to design: Exploring electrical tuning of branched flow in liquid crystal films 45 minutes ago Automated laboratory system uses robotic equipment directed by AI to reengineer enzymes 53 minutes ago Engineers uncover new mechanism for gene transfer 1 hour ago Armor for steel: New method could enable advances in energy, electronics and aerospace 1 hour ago Relevant PhysicsForums posts Faraday pulsation 1 hour ago Stellar evolution path and Regression line 9 hours ago Would discovery of a galaxy without dark matter disprove MOND? 15 hours ago Our Beautiful Universe - Photos and Videos Jan 12, 2024 Sample and Return of Asteroid Bennu - live on Oct 20, 2020 at 1720 GMT Jan 12, 2024 Where are the black holes? Jan 10, 2024 More from Astronomy and Astrophysics 1 2 Medical Xpress Medical research advances and health news Tech Xplore The latest engineering, electronics and technology advances Science X The most comprehensive sci-tech news coverage on the web Newsletters Science X Daily and the Weekly Email Newsletter are free features that allow you to receive your favorite sci-tech news updates in your email inbox Follow us Top Home Search Mobile version Help FAQ About Contact Science X Account Premium Account Archive News wire Android app iOS app RSS feeds Push notification © Phys.org 2003 - 2024 powered by Science X Network Privacy policy Terms of use Managed by Google. Complies with IAB TCF. CMP ID: 300 1 / 1 UKIDSS J-band finding chart for 4XMM J182531.5–144036. The red circle is centered on the XMM-Newton detected position, with a radius of 1′′ equal to the positional error. The white circle is centered on the Chandra detected position and has a radius of 0.6′′ equal to its positional error. Credit: arXiv (2024). DOI: 10.48550/arxiv.2401.02468

Astronomer från Open University i Milton Keynes, Storbritannien och från andra håll rapporterar upptäckten av ett nytt binärt Be/X-ray-system. Det nyupptäckta systemet, med beteckningen 4XMM J182531.5-144036, uppvisar en ihållande röntgenemission. Upptäckten beskrivs i detalj i en artikel som publicerades den 4 januari på pre-print-servern arXiv.

Röntgenbinarier består av en normal stjärna eller en vit dvärg som överför massa till en kompakt neutronstjärna eller ett svart hål. Baserat på kompanjonstjärnans massa delar astronomerna in dem i röntgentvillingstjärnor med låg massa (LMXB) och röntgentvillingstjärnor med hög massa (HMXB).

Be/X-ray binaries (Be/XRBs) är den största undergruppen av HMXBs. Dessa system består av Be-stjärnor och, vanligtvis, neutronstjärnor, inklusive pulsarer. Observationer har visat att de flesta av dessa system uppvisar en svag ihållande röntgenemission som avbryts av utbrott som varar i flera veckor.

4XMM J182531.5-144036 upptäcktes ursprungligen som en hård röntgenkälla i april 2008 med ESA:s XMM-Newton-satellit. Eftersom dess natur fortfarande är okänd har ett team av astronomer under ledning av Andrew Mason Jr. från Open University analyserat tillgängliga data från XMM-Newton, NASA:s Chadra-sond, Very Large Telescope (VLT) och UKIDSS (UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) Galactic Plane Survey, för att undersöka denna källa.

Studien visade att positionen för 4XMM J182531.5-144036 sammanfaller med ett infrarött objekt som uppvisar ett närinfrarött överskott jämfört med spektrumet hos tidiga dvärg- eller jättestjärnor av B-typ. Detta objekt uppvisar också en stark emissionslinje för väte. Forskarna noterade att dessa egenskaper är karakteristiska för Be-stjärnor.

Dessutom upptäcktes en koherent röntgenpulsation hos 4XMM J182531.5-144036, med en period på 781 sekunder. Förekomsten av en sådan pulsation är typisk för BeXRB-pulsarer. Astronomerna tillade att röntgenpulsprofilen är asymmetrisk, vilket ses i röntgenpulsarer och det kan ge information om neutronstjärnans magnetfältsstruktur.

Enligt artikeln har röntgenpulsationen setts med samma profil i vitt skilda XMM-Newton- och Chandra-observationer. Detta tyder på att röntgenstrålningen sannolikt är ihållande.

När det gäller omloppstiden för 4XMM J182531.5-144036 beräknar forskarna att den ligger inom intervallet 250-500 dagar. Systemets bana visade sig ha en låg excentricitet.

”Vi drar därför slutsatsen att 4XMM J182531.5-144036 är en nyligen identifierad persistent, lång period, Be/X-ray binär”, skrev författarna till studien.

Astronomerna uppskattar att avståndet till 4XMM J182531.5-144036 är mellan 3 300 och 23 00 ljusår. De noterade dock att systemet är för svagt för att upptäckas av ESA:s Gaia-satellit, så det finns ingen oberoende uppskattning av avståndet.

Ytterligare information: A. B. Mason et al, 4XMM J182531.5–144036: A new persistent Be/X-ray binary found
within the XMM-Newton serendipitous survey, arXiv (2024). DOI: 10.48550/arxiv.2401.02468

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